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Moller International, Inc. The developer of the Skycar® a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) capable, high-speed light aircraft, announced that it has established a relationship with American Space Industries (ASI) of Menlo Park, CA to produce sub-scale models of the Skycar®.  These electrically-powered unmanned radio-controlled reproductions of the Skycar®are intended for model aircraft fans who want to experience the thrill of flying a VTOL aircraft with the extraordinary characteristics of the Skycar®.

President and founder of Moller International, Dr. Paul Moller said of this new partnership, “We know that there is a tremendous market for RC aircraft, and we think the Skycar’s design will provide an excellent basis for those hobbyists that want a VTOL aircraft that also has high-performance aerodynamics”.  He also added, “We expect that we can use these reproductions to test out some of our control theory and add to our knowledge regarding the performance of a personal VTOL aircraft.”

Russell Decker, CEO of ASI said, “American Space Industries is very pleased to be working with Moller International to help put this futuristic vehicle into hobbyist’s hands today. Dr. Moller’s Skycar® is a pioneering example of the advanced flight concepts that will help define the future of personal flight. Building and flying a radio control version of this vehicle, and utilizing the latest manufacturing techniques and new super-lightweight materials, the craft will provide hours of fun for hobbyists everywhere. Recent advancements in battery design, material science, and computer technology permit the operation of this radio control model that will closely emulate the extremely precise flight characteristics of the Moller Skycar®“. The Skycar® is not a Quad-copter, it’s much more and this model is the first of its kind at this scale and will be an absolute dream to fly.

Moment of Science - Esperanto

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For the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who, Ken Spivey of The Ken Spivey Band, dedicates his song Health to the Company to all his friends and companions.  Meanwhile The Lab Staff uses the WayForward Device to see how they resolve their season one cliffhanger.

BREAKING NEWS – The very popular Facebook Page Doctor Who and The TARDIS by Craig Hurle has also recently undergone a regeneration for the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who.  It is now The Doctor Who Hub 

How does fiction quickly indicate that the story takes place in an altered history? Easy, the sky will be full of airships.  With few exceptions this mode of transport has been relegated to the past.  To see airships in wide spread use now is mere fantasy.  Or is it?

Mac Byers came up with this design for his final project while at the University of Huddersfield.  As you can see from the video below, it combines the luxury cruise concept with air travel.  Now all they need to do is add a little more 19th century flare, and I am sure our Steampunk brethren will be the first to purchase a ticket.

The technology behind this design is currently being developed by Aeroscraft.  Lift is primarily coming from the engines, leaving the helium to offset the weight of the cargo.

I should state at the outset that I live within walking distance of Maker Faire, and I have since it started (or so I gather.)  And yet, this was my first visit.  Once I knew it existed, I heard all about the crowds and such, and decided I didn’t want to deal with it.

 

This year, I decided to go anyway, darn it.  I was so very glad I did.

 

Maker Faire, it turns out, is basically a huge conglomeration of things I’m interested in.  Model steam trains? Yep.  How about food science? Of course!  Innovative music? Space Travel? Fabric arts? Robots? Indeed!  All that and more.  Seriously, check out the website and see for yourself. The variety is astounding.

 

We entered, walked past a huge flaming rose, and into the thick of things. There were some presentations that we’d considered attending, but we only went to one, and that one we found by accident.  While I listened to the Librarians Making Makerspaces presentation  my hubby took a turn around the building we’d found ourselves in.  He showed me a few things when I was done, and then we continued on.

 

And on.  And on.  I’d thought that we’d go for a few hours, then head back home.  That…was not what happened. There were so many interesting things to see and learn about!  I can see why this event lasts for more than one day.

 

Next year, we are definitely getting the whole weekend pass.  It was very difficult to talk ourselves into leaving this time, and I think that will help.  The promised crowds were most evident in the Expo Hall, but really weren’t that bad elsewhere.  Even then, we aren’t talking about Disneyland on the 4th of July crowds in the Expo Hall.  More like Disneyland on a Summer weekday.  FYI, if you are at all sensitive to noise, you may wish to give the building with the Tesla Stage in it a miss.  The room is dark, but there is a lot of competing loud noise in there.

 

Anyway, once we were done with the Faire proper, we hunted up the Maker Shed for a spot of shopping.  And that was where I found the shiny new Arduino Workshop by John Boxall.  This book just came out in May.  Obviously, I bought it…and a few other things.

So…I’ll be switching over to Arduino Workshop for my Arduino learning process.

 

Wish me luck!